No, Your Computer Isn’t Slow

It’s really frustrating when you are sitting at your computer, staring at that stupid hourglass, waiting for… whatever. Everybody hates when a computer is slow to download. It’s really inconvenient.

But when I hear someone complain about this, I have to laugh inside. I can’t help but think, as I’m trying to send that e-mail, that 100 short years ago, if I had wanted to get that message delivered, a whole different process would have to occur.

You’d write the message. You’d give it to a delivery person, or deliver it yourself. You’d go outside. You’d saddle your horse. You’d hop on. You’d ride across town. You’d deliver the message. You’d probably be obligated to socialize. You’d then return home, where you’d groom and feed the horse and clean his stall. It’s amazing that anyone got anything done.

Suddenly a slow e-mail doesn’t seem so bad. Even at its worst, it sure beats saddle sores. Try not to forget that.

I feel the same way about microwaves. How can we possibly get impatient with a microwave when a century ago you’d have been sweating in a hot kitchen, after having spent months raising your crops and/or your livestock, then going through the monumental hassle of preparing, cooking and serving the meal? And lest we forget, no refrigeration. We should kiss our microwaves.

We are able to do everything so much faster these days that somewhere along the way, we’ve forgotten about patience and appreciation. I’m not sure that sacrificing those qualities for the sake of convenience was a fair trade.

hourglass

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Listening to the Yes

It’s so easy to take shortcuts in life. Frozen vegetables. Fast food. The elevator instead of the stairs. The less than optimal and yet oh-so-convenient partner.

While these things may save time and effort, in the long run, or in the grander scheme of things, they aren’t the best choices. My inner voice tries to tell me this all the time. I’ve just gotten too used to ignoring that voice over the years. But it’s still there.

I know that when my husband and I prepare a delicious meal from scratch, with a variety of fresh vegetables, I can hear my inner voice saying, “Yes!” When I exert myself to the point that I know I’ll sleep well that night, it says, “Yes, yes! Oh, yes!” When I stand up for myself and don’t accept rude treatment, “YES!!!!”

I need to get back into the habit of listening to the yes. Even better, I need to do things in anticipation thereof. I need to encourage the yes. Live the yes. Be the yes I want to see in the world.

Why is that so hard sometimes?

Yes

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I Don’t Want a Jetpack

When I was little, my favorite cartoon was the Jetsons. This fascinating story of a family living way in the future, amongst efficient and complicated gadgets and jet cars always excited my imagination. I was convinced, as were many of my contemporaries, that by the year 2000 we’d all be flying around using jetpacks in a world where the robots would be doing all the work.

I was really looking forward to this future, and at first was rather disappointed that it didn’t come to pass. But in retrospect, I’m rather glad it hasn’t. As much fun as it might be to visit, I wouldn’t want to live in a world that’s so cold and clinical and devoid of nature. The Jetsons lived in a world without trees or water or the random messiness of life that makes it so interesting. It also seems a little devoid of purpose. There’s no real struggle if everything is done for you, and without struggle there’s no growth.

I wouldn’t want to give up camping trips or serendipity or variety for a jetpack. If everything were convenient and easy, what would we talk about? What stories could we tell? What would I blog about?

Jetsons Pic