The View from a Drawbridge

The random musings of a bridgetender with entirely too much time on her hands.

Live Your Dash

The View from a Drawbridge

I was completely befuddled when I heard that expression for the first time the other day. But once it was explained to me, it immediately became part of my personal philosophical handbook. We should all live our dashes. Imagine your tombstone. It will include the date you were born, a dash, and the date you …

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I’ve had a lot of cars in my lifetime, but I’ve only bought one that was brand new. It was a 1998 Saturn SL2. I loved that car. Not only because it got me from point A to point B, but at the time the Saturn folks were embarked on this radical new philosophy in …

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I saw that tag line in a Facebook advertisement for therapy, and it made me think of a conversation I had with a friend from Burma. He said, “In the West, you think you deserve happiness, so you get upset, depressed, anxious or bitter if you don’t have it. In the East, we don’t expect …

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A friend of mine challenged me to write a blog entry about the Wheel of Fortune. Not the game show, thank goodness, but a much meatier topic: the medieval philosophy about fate. So here goes. You see this topic coming up over and over again in the literature of the time. They believed that the …

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Once upon a time I was a freelance editor. I suppose I still am, technically. I just haven’t pursued work in that arena for quite some time. I enjoyed it, yes, but mainly did it to keep the wolves from the door. The wolves are still out there, but my door is a little more …

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The shock of having the person I loved most in the world die unexpectedly two weeks ago has taught me much. Life is as fragile as a soap bubble. It could pop at any moment and that’s it. You’re done. Because life is so fragile, it’s precious. You only get a little bit of it, …

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The first time I went to college I was 18 years old, and I had struggled so hard to be there that I kind of looked upon the professors as Gods. They constituted this great pantheon of pedagoguery and I was eager to soak up whatever knowledge they saw fit to impart. I didn’t question …

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