Reclaiming the Day

Have you ever had one of those days? A day of traffic snarls, annoying errands, clerical stupidity, unwanted expenditures, stupid people and disappointing friends. I was tired, hungry, I had to pee, and I was annoyed at the world. That’s never a good feeling. Even while it’s happening, I realize that that is not a headspace for making major life decisions.

When I’m in that state of mind, I have awful thoughts. People suck. Why on earth did I move out here? I don’t belong in Seattle. I don’t understand people out here. Nobody likes me. They don’t give a sh** about me. I hated Florida with its horrible politics and its oppressive heat, but at least there things made sense, and people could be counted on. There are too many people here. I feel like I’m suffocating. I want to go home.

I felt like crying.

Instead, I text-vented to a good friend in Florida, who had the sense to just listen and not try to talk me out of it. He knew I already knew I needed to pee, eat, and be around the one person I can count on out here: dear husband.

And sure enough, Hubby was on his way. And he had some idea what he was driving into. Storm clouds on my horizon.

There’s a reason I chose Always Look on the Bright Side of Life as his ring tone. That man could put a positive slant on the four horses of the apocalypse. And he does it in such a charming and sincere way that you can’t even get annoyed. He also does that “I’m a guy, so I’m supposed to solve stuff” thing. Which must be upsetting from his perspective, because not everything can be solved.

But in this case, he handled my mood with aplomb. He drove up, wearing a bright, sunny, yellow shirt, and had my favorite Jason Mraz album playing on the radio. “Hey there, Sunshine!” He said. “Let’s find you a bathroom.”

After accomplishing that mission, he took me out for seafood. He made me feel special. He made me feel heard.

I could see what an effort he was making to be positive, and that naturally made me want to be positive, too. So I started saying things like, “What lovely weather we’re having,” and “Look at those beautiful flowers.” All while grumbling inside. But I was trying.

Your attitude impacts your outlook. If I had continued in “people suck” mode, the evening would have gone completely down the drain. Instead, I decided to follow his positive lead, rather than make his day as awful as mine had been up to his arrival.

After that, we went to see Wings Over Washington, which was so much fun it got a blog post of its own. And then we went home, watched Handmaid’s Tale, hugged the dogs, and went to sleep smiling.

Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, we resurrected the day. And that made me realize that looking at days as a solid unit can be a mistake. A day doesn’t have to be all bad, from beginning to end. It’s possible to live in the moment. It’s possible to turn things around.

I hope I remember that. If I don’t, I have someone walking beside me who will remind me by example. And that’s pretty darned amazing.

Moon Phoenix

Check out my refreshingly positive book for these depressingly negative times. http://amzn.to/2mlPVh5

 

4 thoughts on “Reclaiming the Day

  1. Angiportus Librarysaver

    I wish we asexuals all had someone like that…
    I wouldn’t consider “Handmaid’s Tale” to be uplifting fare, tv or print version. It’s on the list of “stuff I’ve heard just enough about to not want to touch.” But you might be made of stronger
    stuff.
    Question. How come swing bridges–the older ones anyway–have that wooden structure in the middle, reaching upstream and downstream from the central pivot, so that it’s under the span when the latter is swung open 90 degrees? I thought it might be a support of some sort, but not sure. The specimen we have here in Mt V. doesn’t seem to have any devices on that structure to engage the opened span. Maybe you know something about this?

    1. 1) Everyone should have someone like that.
      2) While it’s not exactly uplifting, Handmaid’s Tale is, by a country mile, the best series I’ve ever seen in my entire life. The acting is incredible. While the story is rather horrifying, it is also a story about resistance and survival and remembering who you are under the worst circumstances imaginable. We are strong when we need to be.
      3) I’m not sure without a photograph, but I’m guessing that wooden structure is a pier protection system, because boaters aren’t always the best navigators.

  2. Angiportus Librarysaver

    You’re right, it is to protect the opened span, as well as providing support during construction of same [if, as I suspect, these are built open and then swung shut]. The latter is a guess. I checked Wikipedia. Thanks.

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